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A Happy Ending for Surprise Diagnosis for One Doctor by Another Doctor from a Land Far Far Away

A Happy Ending for Surprise Diagnosis for One Doctor by Another Doctor from a Land Far Far Away

June 23, 2022 | By Mozna Osman

Introduction from the IAES Blog Team:

IAES is proud to present to you the AE story of a doctor that truly exemplifies our international impact! We hope you find this as inspirational as we have.

—–

I am a family medical doctor living and practicing medicine in Khartoum, Sudan. My story began about three years ago when I realized I was often feeling very tired and had terrible headaches. I decided to go and get my own blood work analyzed to see if there were any obvious issues going on. What I found out was that I had Malaria and a UTI (urinary tract infection). As a doctor, I decided to go ahead and treat myself with the appropriate medications needed for both issues.

I thought I was doing well and, on the mend, but I was not. Not long after this, my son found me, unresponsive, on the floor. I was admitted into the intensive care unit (ICU) of a local hospital and was in a coma for a month. As luck would have it, a visiting doctor from Chicago was asked to review my case. After reviewing my medical chart, he diagnosed me with anti-NMDA Autoimmune Encephalitis. He suggested a course of treatment that included medication and plasmapheresis. I feel very fortunate and blessed to have had my case reviewed by a doctor from so far away.

I am now feeling much but better but I still suffer from memory issues like many patients with AE. My short memory seems more affected by AE than my long-term memory but is getting much better. I am happy to report I am back to practicing medicine and am working at AL-Shaheed Wedatallah Medical Center in Khartoum. I am hoping for a bright, happy, and healthy future.

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Become an Advocate by sharing your story. It may result in accurate diagnosis for someone suffering right now who is yet to be correctly identified. Submit your story with two photos to IAES@autoimmune-encephalitis.org

 

 

International Autoimmune Encephalitis Society (IAES), home of the AEWarrior®, is the only Family/Patient-centered organization that assists members from getting a diagnosis through to recovery and the many challenges experienced in their journey. Your donations are greatly appreciated and are the direct result of IAES’ ability to develop the first product in the world to address the needs of patients, Autoimmune Encephalitis Trivia Playing Cards. Every dollar raised allows us to raise awareness and personally help Patients, Families, and Caregivers through their Journey with AE to ensure that the best outcomes can be reached. Your contribution to our mission will help save lives and improve the quality of life for those impacted by AE. 

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For those interested in face masks, clothing, mugs, and other merchandise, check out our AE Warrior Store!  This online shop was born out of the desire for the AE patient to express their personal pride in fighting such a traumatic disease and the natural desire to spread awareness. Join our AE family and help us continue our mission to support patients, families and caregivers while they walk this difficult journey.  

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Be a part of the solution by supporting IAES with a donation today.

 

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Psychosis or Something More? A Family’s Search for Answers

Psychosis or Something More? A Family’s Search for Answers

May 26, 2022 | By Libya Matney

Introduction from the IAES Blog Team:

The International Autoimmune Encephalitis Society is proud to present to you the AE story of one of our mighty Warriors in her own words, an article written about her AE path in the University of Arkansas newspaper (link below) and beautiful artwork given to her by a wonderful friend and artist depicting her within the struggle of this devastating diagnosis!

 

As a 21-year-old stay at home mom to a precious little boy, Benjamin, I never thought that something so life-altering would happen to me. My husband and I had spent 9 months trying to conceive our second child. Finally, in June of 2021, we were able to get pregnant. Around the same time, many random things started happening to my body. Nobody understood what was happening. My scalp was burning, I had chronic migraines, confusion, insomnia, OCD tendencies, and I started showing aggression towards my family. All these things seemed to begin to rule my life. I began cleaning my house aggressively and trying to get rid of everything that I own. I would tear things out of the closets and try to reorganize them at the same time. I was exhausted. I was forgetting everything. I began to believe that I couldn’t be left alone to take care of my son. My family and friends began taking turns staying with me during the day. At this point I had been to the doctor several times and had multiple blood tests and two CT scans. Everything came back normal.

On August 19th, 2021, my husband and mother-in-law decided to take me to a hospital in Fayetteville, Arkansas (AR) to see if they could figure out what was happening to me. They performed the same blood tests and scans that I had received previously and, of course, they came back normal. On the way home from the hospital that day, I had what the doctors would call a “psychotic break”. I began kicking and hitting my husband in the car and trying to open the door to get out. My husband and mother-in-law frantically called my mom. She said that she could hear my husband in the background begging me to stop. My mom told them that she was on her way to us and to call 911. When the police and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) arrived, my mom had my doctor on the phone to convince them that something was medically wrong with me and that I needed to be taken to the emergency room (ER). When EMS tried to get me to the gurney I dropped to the ground. They had to lift me onto the gurney and into the ambulance. This was when I was transported to the ER in my hometown, North Arkansas Regional Medical Center (NARMC). The last thing I remember from that fateful day was stopping in a restaurant parking lot and trying to get out of the car. I don’t remember the police or paramedics being there. I don’t remember anything from the rest of that day or the month that followed.

My family has told me that while I was in the ER, I kept trying to leave. I would fight the medical staff and my family so hard that they had to restrain my arms and legs to keep me from getting out of bed or hurting myself. During the 4 days that I was in the ER at NARMC, I had a CT scan, an MRI, a spinal tap, and multiple blood tests done. I ended up miscarrying my child the last day that I was there. I was transferred to St. Bernard’s Medical Center in Jonesboro, AR on August 23rd, 2021. During the transfer, I slipped into an unresponsive/catatonic state. A procedure was performed to remove the tissue from the fetus, as well as the same testing that had previously been done in the ER. Other testing that was done consisted of EEGs and ultrasounds. Six days after being transferred I was placed on a ventilator because of having back-to-back seizures and my heart stopping. After two weeks of having no nourishment besides IV fluids, a feeding tube was also placed in my nose. I was in St. Bernard’s for a month before they sent my blood and spinal fluid to Mayo Clinic. An infectious disease doctor diagnosed me with anti-NMDA Receptor Autoimmune Encephalitis and GFAP. A few days before I left St. Bernard’s, I woke up with a feeding tube still in my nose. I did not know the month, day, or what was happening. I couldn’t walk or use the right upper side of my body. Also, due to having been on the ventilator and having the feeding tube, I could not talk. I was given a letterboard to communicate and the first thing that I asked about was my pregnancy. I couldn’t remember miscarrying the baby. On September 22nd, I was transferred to Barnes Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, Mo. Doctors began plasmapheresis (plasma exchange).  During the 10 days that I was there I received 5 rounds of it. I had another MRI, EEG, spinal tap, and two ultrasounds during my stay there.  Blood and spinal fluid samples were sent to Mayo Clinic to be rechecked. On October 1st, I was moved to Everest Rehabilitation Center in Rogers, AR, where I spent every day in physical, occupational, and speech therapy. I had to relearn how to walk, and I had to regain my physical strength and my voice. My last week at the rehab center, I finally got to see my son, Benjamin, after not seeing him for over a month. They included him in my physical and occupational therapy. On October 19th, two months after being taken to the first hospital, I was released to finally go home. When I got home, I started outpatient physical therapy at Mount Carmel Physical Therapy Center in Harrison, AR. I had physical therapy twice a week for 8 weeks. In January of 2022, I had two rounds of Rituxan infusions.

I am now back home with husband and son, and I can enjoy spending time with my family and friends once again. My life will never be the same after my AE diagnosis. I will always have to keep tabs on my stress levels and watch for signs of relapse. I still have months before I can drive again and am still at risk for seizures. However, I have learned a lot the past year. I’ve been cared for by people that will forever hold a place in my heart. I’ve grown, I’ve changed, and I am thankful for the life and family that God has blessed me with. 

libya matney art - Psychosis or Something More? A Family's Search for Answers

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Become an Advocate by sharing your story. It may result in accurate diagnosis for someone suffering right now who is yet to be correctly identified. Submit your story with two photos to IAES@autoimmune-encephalitis.org

 

 

International Autoimmune Encephalitis Society (IAES), home of the AEWarrior®, is the only Family/Patient-centered organization that assists members from getting a diagnosis through to recovery and the many challenges experienced in their journey. Your donations are greatly appreciated and are the direct result of IAES’ ability to develop the first product in the world to address the needs of patients, Autoimmune Encephalitis Trivia Playing Cards. Every dollar raised allows us to raise awareness and personally help Patients, Families, and Caregivers through their Journey with AE to ensure that the best outcomes can be reached. Your contribution to our mission will help save lives and improve the quality of life for those impacted by AE. 

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For those interested in face masks, clothing, mugs, and other merchandise, check out our AE Warrior Store!  This online shop was born out of the desire for the AE patient to express their personal pride in fighting such a traumatic disease and the natural desire to spread awareness. Join our AE family and help us continue our mission to support patients, families and caregivers while they walk this difficult journey.  

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Be a part of the solution by supporting IAES with a donation today.

 

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An overview of N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibody-associated encephalitis

An overview of N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibody-associated encephalitis

May 11, 2022 | by Seery N, Butzkueven H, O’Brien TJ, Monif M.

A message from IAES Blog Staff:

It is our honor & pleasure to present to all of you an overview of anti-NMDAR Autoimmune Encephalitis by the esteemed team at Monash University in Australia & lead by Dr. Mastura Monif. The International Autoimmune Encephalitis Society is proud to be in collaboration with Dr. Monif and her team in the Australian Autoimmune Encephalitis Consortium Project. Dr. Monif is on the board of directors for IAES and we work closely with them to best support AE patients, caregivers and their families. You can find out more about the team and their efforts to help those with AE and their families via the following link: https://www.monash.edu/medicine/autoimmune-encephalitis

 —-

An overview of N-methyl D-asparate receptor (NMDAR) antibody-associated encephalitis

Contemporary advances in anti-NMDAR antibody (Ab)-mediated encephalitis, Autoimmunity Reviews, April 2022, Volume 21, Issue 4, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.autrev.2022.103057

WHY WE DID THIS WORK:

  • N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibody-associated encephalitis, or anti-NMDAR encephalitis is a type of autoimmune encephalitis. Autoimmune encephalitis occurs when parts of the body’s immune system inappropriately attack certain components of nerve cells in the brain. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis is one of the most common defined types of autoimmune encephalitis. Young people who are on average 21 years of age, and females, experience the illness most commonly. But it can occur in older adults (over 45 years) and in young children (less than 12 years), where a relatively higher number of patients are males.
  • To make a diagnosis, doctors record key symptoms (e.g. memory issues, personality change, changes to behaviour alteration, or seizures) and clinical features from tests. The detection of antibodies that bind the receptor (NMDAR) from a patient’s blood or cerebrospinal fluid (fluid that cushions the brain and spinal cord) are also used to confirm the diagnosis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system that in normal circumstances have a role in fighting infections. In certain autoimmune diseases, antibodies, along with other parts of the immune system, target normal components of a healthy individual.
  • Anti-NMDAR encephalitis can be treated using medications that selectively reduce components of the immune system, but as the illness is different from person to person, it is challenging to both diagnose and manage. The use of biological markers, or biomarkers (proteins, cells or other characteristics that can generally be detected via a certain test and are association with a particular disease), may be particularly useful for the diagnosis and assessment of how effective treatment is to manage a patient’s illness. Accurate and specific biomarkers for anti-NMDAR encephalitis still do not exist.
  • We did this update to collect the latest research findings from the field to inform researchers and clinicians who manage this condition and have a keen interest.

WHAT WERE THE THINGS WE DISCOVERED?

  • The N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) belongs to a group called glutamate-gated ionotropic receptors. These receptors are mostly located in a region of the brain called the hippocampus more so than other regions, and assist in excitatory transmission of nerve cells. In anti-NMDAR encephalitis, antibodies target a part of the receptor called GluN1.Anti-NMDAR antibodies exist in the serum part of blood and the cerebrospinal fluid.
  • Biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid that have been identified include B-cell and T-cell chemokines, which are molecules that serve to attract particular white cells to a given part of the body (in particular, CXCL13 and CXCL10), interferon gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukins (in particular 6, 7, 10 and 17-A). The levels of certain of these biomarkers were found to also coincide with poor long-term outcomes in patients.

TRIGGERS OF ANTI-NMDAR ENCEPHALITIS:

  • Two known triggers for anti-NMDAR encephalitis are the presence of an ovarian teratoma (an unusual type of tumour that can express nervous tissue) and less commonly, a viral infection of the brain called HSV-encephalitis.
  • Other than these two triggers it is less understood what causes the illness. At a molecular level, patient antibodies induce complex changes to the nerves by disrupting the functioning of the receptor. These findings may explain the variety of symptoms that patients experience, and varying and often impressive degrees of recovery.

CLINICAL FEATURES:

  • The diagnosis of the disease is not always straightforward. Symptoms and other clinical features may overlap with other diseases, and sometimes, at least in the blood, antibodies to the receptor may be seen without the disease itself. A broad range of clinical features exists in anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Patients can experience the following, which may change over time –
      • Changes in behaviour and hallucinations (psychiatric symptoms)
      • Difficulties in mental function (cognitive impairment)
      • Seizures
      • Abnormal movements and
      • Irregularities of the function of the autonomic nervous system (e.g. temperature, heart rate and breathing).
  • Therefore, detection of certain proteins and molecules in the blood or spinal fluid may assist in the diagnosis of the disease, and its management. A variety of candidates have been explored, but so far, generally remain limited in their use in clinical practice.

TREATMENT:

  • The cornerstone of treatment is suppression of the immune system. Research has shown that earlier treatment results in a better long-term outcome.
  • Exciting new treatment options are emerging, but research studies for these treatments are limited to relatively small numbers of patients and their approval for use by government therapeutic agencies is still awaiting. Therefore, we advise clinicians making the decision to use new therapies be made on based on each individual patient’s situation. 

WHAT DO THE FINDINGS MEAN?

  • This research can help clinicians understand how the illness progresses at the cellular and molecular level, its symptoms, the results of supportive tests (e.g. spinal fluid and MRI) and treatment options, and highlight areas of progress and needs in the current research.
  • Most patients will have some degree of recovery in their illness following appropriate treatment, but some symptoms can persist, particularly issues in mental function. Cognitive rehabilitation and follow up with psychiatry and psychology and in some cases antipsychotic medication, anti-depressants and mood stabilizers maybe warranted.

monif group - An overview of N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibody-associated encephalitis

2021 Monif group L-R – Paul Sanfilippo, Nabil Seery, Katrina Kan, Robb Wesselingh, William O’Brien, Tiffany Rushen, Mastura Monif (Group Leader), Tracie Tan, Sher Chim Ting, Sarah Griffith, Andrea Muscat.

 

For more information and resources on anti-NMDAr encephalitis, visit this link here. To download a plain language PDF of the paper summarized in this blog, click the button below:

 

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Become an Advocate by sharing your story. It may result in accurate diagnosis for someone suffering right now who is yet to be correctly identified. Submit your story with two photos to IAES@autoimmune-encephalitis.org  

 

 

International Autoimmune Encephalitis Society (IAES), home of the AEWarrior®, is the only Family/Patient-centered organization that assists members from getting a diagnosis through to recovery and the many challenges experienced in their journey. Your donations are greatly appreciated and are the direct result of IAES’ ability to develop the first product in the world to address the needs of patients, Autoimmune Encephalitis Trivia Playing Cards. Every dollar raised allows us to raise awareness and personally help Patients, Families, and Caregivers through their Journey with AE to ensure that the best outcomes can be reached. Your contribution to our mission will help save lives and improve the quality of life for those impacted by AE.   Trivia Playing cards 3 FB 500x419 - An overview of N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibody-associated encephalitis For this interested in face masks, clothing, mugs, and other merchandise, check out our AE Warrior Store!  This online shop was born out of the desire for the AE patient to express their personal pride in fighting such a traumatic disease and the natural desire to spread awareness. Join our AE family and help us continue our mission to support patients, families and caregivers while they walk this difficult journey.   AE Warrior Store 300x200 - An overview of N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibody-associated encephalitis

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Falling through the looking glass…

Falling through the looking glass…


March 9, 2022 | by Rachael Muggleton

In May of 2020, I was a healthy, vibrant, smart, loving, pre-med student at Penn State, nicknamed the ‘mayor’ of my large friend network … until I fell acutely ill. Within 7 days of hospital admission, for what seemed like some type of stress induced altered mental status, I became catatonic. My mom watched in horror as her daughter’s light rapidly dimmed; losing a piece of what defined me each day. By day 7, I no longer spoke or appeared to recognize anyone, my heart rate became unstable, I could no longer walk or eat, and my kidneys began to fail. I was rushed to the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) with a preliminary diagnosis of Anti-NMDAr Autoimmune Encephalitis (AE) – an illness my family had never heard of, but one unfortunately they would get to know very well over the next six months of my horrific journey. 

IMG 5128 225x300 - Falling through the looking glass...Full disclosure — this part of my story comes from my mom; I don’t remember anything from my admission until fuzzy memories of my time in inpatient rehab 5 months later. By the time I reached URMC I was catatonic, seizures were starting to take over. My mother described the surreal experience as ‘seeing our beautiful Rachie rapidly falling through the AE ‘looking glass’ – a tumbling, bouncing, free fall which lasted for days, weeks, eventually resulting with me being placed on life support for months’. 

Timing is everything, right?! It was during COVID lockdown, visitation was not allowed. My family was no longer able to be by my side. For 42 days, physicians and nurses cared for me while in a medically induced coma; trying to quell the relentless seizures. My mom sat on the virtual sidelines, distraught, making decisions regarding PIC lines, arterial lines, sedation, feeding tubes and a tracheostomy – decisions she never imagined she’d be making for her child, who outside of a tonsillectomy, was the picture of health. Without the communication, compassion, trust and love I received from the URMC team, my mother said she wasn’t so sure she would have been able to get through those first 42 days. They were her eyes, ears, and most importantly, heart. 

IMG 5127 225x300 - Falling through the looking glass...When restrictions finally lifted and my parents were able to be by my side, they witnessed firsthand what a cruel, relentless illness AE was. There is no official playbook. My mom, a person who prefers order and predictability, was at a loss watching the team trying to control an illness that twisted and turned, never letting up. AE laughed at us and didn’t care how desperately we wanted it to release its grip. During this acute phase, one of my Neuro-intensivists explained his view on Anti-NMDAr AE (after treating a handful of cases each year) to my mom – ‘It comes out of nowhere, attacks HARD, stays as long as it pleases, eventually leaves, rarely returns. Our job is to treat Rachael with what we know works and keep her alive until it leaves”, and they did just that. I received steroids, plasma pheresis, IVIG, Rituxan and when things still seemed to be stalled, Cytoxan. I was also placed on a strict KETO diet, which in some pediatric patients has been proven effective in reducing/eliminating certain type of seizure activity. 

By mid-August of 2020, my mom tells me, “Our ‘Alice’ ended her free fall and SLOWLY started to reemerge!”. Day by day, small pieces of me started coming back. Eventually, the ICU staff took me out to the children’s garden at URMC (safety protocols in place (!)) to see my brother Andrew for the first time in 4 months (pictured)! 

My family and team celebrated each breath on my own, swallow of water, baby step, new word, and smile! When it was finally time to leave my nurturing Neuro-ICU ‘nest’, the team through me a dance party — sending me off to inpatient rehab in style! Since I have no memory of that time, I’m thankful it was recorded! Taylor Swift’s ‘Shake it Up’ will forever rock as my survival song 😊! 

IMG 5135 300x225 - Falling through the looking glass...

My dance party send off!

I was released from the hospital in October 2020, just short of 6 months. While my journey was far from over, I was on my way! I still needed to be weaned (carefully) from 8 different anti-seizure medications, regain my cognitive functions and physical strength and dexterity. Through the work of an amazing rehab team and sheer determination, I made my way back. By the summer of 2021, I was taking college calculus II and preparing for my college return in the fall. 

IMG 4404 225x300 - Falling through the looking glass...But here’s the best part of my story! In December 2021, I spent a week in the URMC Neuro-ICU, only this time NOT as a patient but rather to shadow the amazing physicians, nurses and professionals to learn firsthand the world of intensive care neurology. As a result of this shadowing, I’m sure they hope I choose Neurology as my specialty (maybe?!), but FAR more was gained from this experience! Rarely do providers, nurses, and staff get to see the results of their amazing efforts, and a recovered AE patient rarely gets to come back to see their heroes in action — Life came full circle. 

I finished my fall semester (Deans List!) and as I write this, and I’ve returned for my final semester at Penn State. I’ll begin studying for the MCATS with the goal of medical school in 2023 (maybe URMC?  😊). Autoimmune Encephalitis was a cruel thief who tried to steal me and subsequently a year of my life, but as the Mad Hatter said to Alice, ‘If you knew time as well as I do, you wouldn’t talk about wasting it’. I’m not about to waste it!! 

My mom reminds me often; I have a story to tell! I think it’s a story of a young woman falling through the looking glass — finding beauty, love, compassion, and competence all along her journey. However, her name isn’t Alice, it’s Rachael. 

Never. Lose. Hope ❤️. 

IMG 5129 300x225 - Falling through the looking glass...

August 2021, me, mom, and stepsister Kaitlyn 

 

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Your generous Donations allow IAES to continue our important work and save lives! 

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Become an Advocate by sharing your story. It may result in accurate diagnosis for someone suffering right now who is yet to be correctly identified. Submit your story with two photos to IAES@autoimmune-encephalitis.org

 

 

International Autoimmune Encephalitis Society (IAES), home of the AEWarrior®, is the only Family/Patient-centered organization that assists members from getting a diagnosis through to recovery and the many challenges experienced in their journey. Your donations are greatly appreciated and are the direct result of IAES’ ability to develop the first product in the world to address the needs of patients, Autoimmune Encephalitis Trivia Playing Cards. Every dollar raised allows us to raise awareness and personally help Patients, Families, and Caregivers through their Journey with AE to ensure that the best outcomes can be reached. Your contribution to our mission will help save lives and improve the quality of life for those impacted by AE. 

Trivia Playing cards 3 FB 500x419 - Falling through the looking glass...

For those interested in face masks, clothing, mugs, and other merchandise, check out our AE Warrior Store!  This online shop was born out of the desire for the AE patient to express their personal pride in fighting such a traumatic disease and the natural desire to spread awareness. Join our AE family and help us continue our mission to support patients, families and caregivers while they walk this difficult journey.  

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Be a part of the solution by supporting IAES with a donation today.

 

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Amy’s Resilience

Amy’s Resilience

March 10, 2021 | By Amy Underwood-Crossley

Message from the IAES blog staff:

We are proud to bring to you the story of an AE Warrior and her journey thus far. Here is to an unlikely diagnosis path and those that have stood by her side!

—-

Amy Crossley 1 300x500 - Amy's ResilienceMy AE journey began quite unexpectedly in 2015! I was attempting to see a doctor for a consultation for spine issues at the Cleveland Clinic. All scans, x-rays, MRIs etc. were sent there for the consult from Ohio State’s Wexner Medical Center.

The surgeon at the Cleveland Clinic quickly told me he could not fix my spine, but he urged me to see a neurologist as he suspected something else was going on in my body. Something that required many tubes of blood and a lumbar puncture. Quickly, it was determined I have NMDA Autoimmune Encephalitis.

I went thru over a year of treatments that left me still very sick physically and with unrelenting psychiatric symptoms.  I, then, contacted folks at IAES who were very helpful in referring me to another specialist. With a new doctor and new treatments, I have had periods of time where my AE seems to be in remission only to rear its ugly head and relapse. I suffer from seizures, tremors, drug induced Parkinson’s disease, mobility issues and lesions in my brain as a result of the AE. I have had many infusions, a complete hysterectomy, ongoing doctor’s visits and, at times, I am better.

Throughout my six-year journey with AE I have had my son and family by my side. My son has been my caretaker. It is an unusual teenage experience for my son, yet he is always here for me. I have hope that by telling my story more people will become aware of AE and I hope over time I will become much better.

Amy Crossley 2 300x500 - Amy's Resilience

 

Your generous Donations allow IAES to continue our important work and save lives! 

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Become an Advocate by sharing your story. It may result in accurate diagnosis for someone suffering right now who is yet to be correctly identified. Submit your story with two photos to IAES@autoimmune-encephalitis.org

 

 

International Autoimmune Encephalitis Society (IAES), home of the AEWarrior®, is the only Family/Patient-centered organization that assists members from getting a diagnosis through to recovery and the many challenges experienced in their journey. Your donations are greatly appreciated and are the direct result of IAES’ ability to develop the first product in the world to address the needs of patients, Autoimmune Encephalitis Trivia Playing Cards. Every dollar raised allows us to raise awareness and personally help Patients, Families, and Caregivers through their Journey with AE to ensure that the best outcomes can be reached. Your contribution to our mission will help save lives and improve the quality of life for those impacted by AE. 

Trivia Playing cards 3 FB 500x419 - Amy's Resilience

For those interested in face masks, clothing, mugs, and other merchandise, check out our AE Warrior Store!  This online shop was born out of the desire for the AE patient to express their personal pride in fighting such a traumatic disease and the natural desire to spread awareness. Join our AE family and help us continue our mission to support patients, families and caregivers while they walk this difficult journey.  

AE Warrior Store 300x200 - Amy's Resilience 

Be a part of the solution by supporting IAES with a donation today.

 

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Our website is not a substitute for independent professional medical advice. Nothing contained on our website is intended to be used as medical advice. No content is intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professional's advice. Although THE INTERNATIONAL AUTOIMMUNE ENCEPHALITIS SOCIETY  provides a great deal of information about AUTOIMMUNE ENCEPHALITIS, all content is provided for informational purposes only. The International Autoimmune Encephalitis Society  cannot provide medical advice.


International Autoimmune Encephalitis Society is a charitable non-profit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 2016 by Tabitha Andrews Orth, Gene Desotell and Anji Hogan-Fesler. Tax ID# 81-3752344. Donations raised directly supports research, patients, families and caregivers impacted by autoimmune encephalitis and to educating healthcare communities around the world. Financial statement will be made available upon request.

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